Frick, I love nature: Comedy as nature education

"Frick, I love nature" logo (Photo by Stephen Robinson)

Last fall I was on a trip with my girlfriend on Vancouver Island. While there, we spent a good chunk of our time exploring its national parks and learning about how life survives in those particular ecosystems. While soaking it all in, I had a...

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Heard it from a Scout: Arctic action — a call for conservation

An aerial view of the Arctic landscape (Photo by NCC)

An aerial view of the Arctic landscape (Photo by NCC)

Each unique landscape in this world — whether it’s a forest, prairie, desert or the Arctic — plays a pivotal role in nature. The Arctic, in particular, supports a variety of flora and fauna while also helping to regulate global...

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Eco-friendly camping: Leaving no trace

Camping is a refreshing way to reconnect with yourself, the people close to you and with Mother Nature. (Photo by Pixabay)

Camping is a refreshing way to reconnect with yourself, the people close to you and with Mother Nature. (Photo by Pixabay)

Camping is a refreshing way to reconnect with yourself, the people close to you and with Mother Nature. It is a great way to forget your troubles and reset your mind, body and soul. For these and many other reasons, the number of people camping is...

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A budding conservationist

Zoe Saranchuk (Photo courtesy of Zoe Saranchuk)

Zoe Saranchuk (Photo courtesy of Zoe Saranchuk)

My name is Zoe Saranchuk, and I love going to Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) events. I love being out in nature and seeing its wonders. I go with my Oma [grandmother], who is also interested. I have always loved animals and learning about...

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Antlers of the East: Tracking the decline of the Atlantic-Gaspésie caribou (part two)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

In part one of Antlers of the East, I discussed the decline of the Atlantic-Gaspésie caribou. Here is part two. Stand against extinction Since 2008, the caribou of Gaspésie National Park have been under the thoughtful study of...

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Measuring what matters: Biocapacity and ecological footprint

Participants of the joint Global Footprint Network and York University workshop (Photo courtesy of Martin J. Bunch, PhD)

Participants of the joint Global Footprint Network and York University workshop (Photo courtesy of Martin J. Bunch, PhD)

The most-used measure of a country’s progress is its gross domestic product (GDP) — the value of the goods and services produced over a period of time, such as a year. A huge drawback of GDP, however, is that it does not fully reflect...

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Antlers of the East: Tracking the decline of the Atlantic-Gaspésie caribou (part one)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

It was August 18, 2017, when I gained the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, an alpine peak of shattered stone and meagre vegetation some 1,270 metres above Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula. Several stones were organized into mounds, marking the...

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Carbon and wetlands: So what's the big deal?

Wetlands can support lots of plants and vegetation. (Photo by Amanda Loder)

Wetlands can support lots of plants and vegetation. (Photo by Amanda Loder)

Wetlands can support a lot of plants and vegetation, which take up carbon from the atmosphere. What's unique about wetlands is that they enable dead plant material and the carbon they contain to be buried in their soils without being released into...

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Botanizing by Lake Ontario: An Australian visits the Nature Conservancy of Canada

Left to right: Cheryl Reyes, Jane Gilbert, Amanda Tracey and Kate Cranney at Presqu'ile Provincial Park (Photo by NCC)

Left to right: Cheryl Reyes, Jane Gilbert, Amanda Tracey and Kate Cranney at Presqu'ile Provincial Park (Photo by NCC)

We looked suspect at best. Picture this: three cars parked in an isolated part of Presqu’ile Provincial Park. Ten people huddled together against the wind and rain. One woman picking something from the ground, holding it up to the light....

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Climate change, fire and their implications for species

Will forest fire hazard signs be over into the red more often because of climate change? (Photo by Aaron H Warren CC BY-ND 2.0)

Will forest fire hazard signs be over into the red more often because of climate change? (Photo by Aaron H Warren CC BY-ND 2.0)

The role of fire in forest ecosystems Forest fires are powerful and devastating. But they are also necessary for the rejuvenation of some ecosystems. Many plants are well adapted to fire. Some trees have dense bark or shed their lower limbs to...

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