Pikas and their islands in the Rockies

American pika (Photo by Allison Haskell)

American pika (Photo by Allison Haskell)

What’s your favourite animal? It’s a common question for many of us with a fascination for wildlife and a passion for conserving the natural world around us. When I answer that my favourite species is American pika, some people are...

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Where are they now? Intern Alumni Spotlight: Victoria Shore

Victoria Shore planting native species while working as an intern at NCC (Photo by NCC)

Victoria Shore planting native species while working as an intern at NCC (Photo by NCC)

This blog marks the seventh Intern Alumni Spotlight — a series highlighting some of the individuals who have interned with the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) in the past. Last month, Ryan Dudragne was featured as the Intern Alumni...

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A cozy nest for a common gartersnake

Common gartersnake (Photo by Hugo Tremblay-CERFO)

Common gartersnake (Photo by Hugo Tremblay-CERFO)

You won’t be surprised to hear that my fellow scientists spend a lot of time in the field in the spring and summer (for species inventories, invasive species control, property monitoring, etc.), but when the snow flies and temperatures drop...

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Antlers of the East: Tracking the decline of the Atlantic-Gaspésie caribou (part one)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

It was August 18, 2017, when I gained the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, an alpine peak of shattered stone and meager vegetation some 1,270 metres above Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula. Several stones were organized into mounds, marking the...

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Carbon and wetlands: So what's the big deal?

Wetlands can support lots of plants and vegetation. (Photo by Amanda Loder)

Wetlands can support lots of plants and vegetation. (Photo by Amanda Loder)

Wetlands can support a lot of plants and vegetation, which take up carbon from the atmosphere. What's unique about wetlands is that they enable dead plant material and the carbon they contain to be buried in their soils without being released into...

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A world without wetlands

Brighton Wetland, Eastern Lake Ontario Coast (Photo by David Coulson)

Brighton Wetland, Eastern Lake Ontario Coast (Photo by David Coulson)

I live next to a swamp. After 20 years of having this swamp as my neighbour, it’s kind of grown on me. I enjoy the spring flush of marsh marigolds, the annual reawakening of spring peepers, and I still smile when I see a colourful wood duck...

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January roundup: Conservation and nature stories from around the world that caught our eye this month

Gray wolf (Photo by Mike Dembeck)

Gray wolf (Photo by Mike Dembeck)

Every day, countless inspiring and informative stories are published about conservation successes or discoveries in nature and wildlife around the world. Here are some that caught our attention in January 2019. Wolves take a snow day Researchers...

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Dr. Crayfish, I presume?

Premek Hamr, PhD (a.k.a. Dr. Crayfish) (Photo courtesy of Premek Hamr, PhD)

Premek Hamr, PhD (a.k.a. Dr. Crayfish) (Photo courtesy of Premek Hamr, PhD)

At the Nature Conservancy of Canada's annual Ontario Region staff meeting last May, a few of us stepped outside to wander the shoreline of Lake Simcoe and admire the sunset. As we rooted around the rocky beach, I took a few photos of plants and...

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Ten good news nature conservation stories from 2018: Our collective actions can have a big impact

Lands within the Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor (Photo by Brent Calver)

Lands within the Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor (Photo by Brent Calver)

Around the world, we are at a crossroads in our relationship with the planet. For the first time in human history our environmental impacts are happening at a scale that is affecting all life on Earth. Our collective experience in solving big,...

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A novice’s guide to a Christmas Bird Count

Bird count volunteers (Photo by NCC)

Bird count volunteers (Photo by NCC)

Scientific study and academia can feel a long way away from the everyday lives of most Canadians, but for anyone with a pair of binoculars and a passion for wildlife, there is an opportunity to join in on the largest and longest running citizen...

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