The Friday Five: Conservation and nature stories from around the world that caught our eye this week

Black bear (Photo by NCC)

Black bear (Photo by NCC)

April 29, 2016 | by Raechel Bonomo | 0 Comments

Each week, countless inspiring and informative stories are published about conservation successes or discoveries in nature and wildlife around the world. Here are some of the conservation and nature stories that caught our attention the week of April 25, 2016:

A grouse scorn

There’s a new sheriff in town and he wants you far, far away from his woods. Hikers on the popular Montane Trail near Canmore, AB have reportedly faced “showdowns” with a territorial male dusky grouse, even if it is only around 30 centimetres tall.

Read more about the bossy bird here >

Underwater protectors

Brockville, Ontario has created the first park of its kind in Canada. The underwater park, adorned with concrete statues of people and benches, aims at protecting the historic shipwrecks that decorate the bottom of the St. Lawrence River from inexperienced divers.

Dive into more here >

Paws off your dog

STOP! Don’t hug that puppy. According to a recent article in Psychology Today, depriving a dog of mobility can increase its stress level and can even cause it to instinctively bite its captor.

Learn more here >

A prehistoric game of iSpy

Five years since their discovery, paleontologist Howard Falcon-Lang has finally examined the tiny fossils he spotted while on a trip to Nova Scotia. Now known as the oldest pine tree remains in the world, these tiny fossils are only a mere seven millimetres long and date back to when dinosaurs walked the Earth.

Search for more here >

A beary amazing species

DYK white bears are 30 percent more effective at catching salmon than their darker-furred relatives? From the common American black bear to the giant grizzly, Canadian Geographic has listed 11 extraordinary facts about the country’s most magnificent bears.

Bear to learn more here >

About the Author

Raechel Bonomo is the editorial coordinator at the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

Read more about Raechel Bonomo.

More by this author »