Written by conservation experts and professionals, Land Lines offers thought-provoking reads about research and discoveries in the conservation field. Interested in contributing to Land Lines or reposting material found on the blog? Visit our blogger resource page.

The elusive wolverine: Beyond the X-Men character

The elusive wolverine. This individual was caught on camera making off from the bait station with a large piece of beaver carcass. (Photo by InnoTech Alberta and Alberta Environment & Parks)

When you think of a wolverine, do you think of an elusive, almost mythical creature with superpowers, or do you think of the comic book character? Most people have heard of X-Men, either through the movies or the comic book series, but few people...

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Coyote Lake: A conservation destination

Coyote Lake, Hopkins, AB (Photo by NCC)

The Hopkins property is located within an hour of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, but it doesn’t feel like it once you arrive at this beautiful place. The property consists of two quarter-sections along the north edge of shallow Coyote Lake....

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The value of volunteers

Conservation Volunteers selfie (Photo by NCC)

How do you measure the value of a volunteer? At the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC), volunteers contribute their time, skills and passion toward our mission of conserving natural landscapes. They help us save money and achieve more with less....

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Keeping my distance from a gentle giant

Moose on Mount Hereford, Quebec (Photo by MRC de Coaticook)

Moose on Mount Hereford, Quebec (Photo by MRC de Coaticook)

I have had a great respect for moose ever since a misadventure at Cape Breton Highlands National Park, Nova Scotia, more than 20 years ago. While hiking along the popular Skyline Trail, my boyfriend and I came across several moose grazing on low...

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How birds survive the winter

Black-capped chickadee in winter (Photo by NCC)

Winter on the prairies is long and cold, often lasting from November until March, and with temperatures falling to -20 °C or -30 °C, it’s a wonder that anything can survive here at all. However, a walk around any residential...

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