September roundup: Conservation and nature stories from around the world that caught our eye this month

Bobolink (Photo by Bill Hubick)

Bobolink (Photo by Bill Hubick)

September 28, 2018 | by Adam Hunter

Hay delay

In an effort to protect grassland bird species, including the threatened bobolink, some PEI farmers postponed their first cut of hay this past summer.

Harvest the story >

Nightingales could disappear into the night

The nightingale, a bird whose numbers have dropped significantly in the United Kingdom, could be going extinct in Hampshire County.

Fly to the story >

Silent but deadly

Scientists are racing to find a fungus that killed off most of the Netherlands’ fire salamander population, before the fungus reaches the United States, a country inhabited by several salamander species.

Sneak over to the story >

A sweet donation

On September 5, the Nature Conservancy of Canada announced the protection of a large sugar maple forest in central Nova Scotia.

Tap into the story >

The ugly beluga

A pod of belugas appears to have adopted a lost narwhal in the St. Lawrence River as one of their own.

Adopt the story >

Miraculous mussels

A boat owner recently came across saltwater marine mussels attached to his boat while in a freshwater lake in BC.

Attach yourself to the story >

Bye-bye birdies

Within the last few decades, an estimated eight bird species have become extinct around the world.

Soar to the story >

A great success

Researchers have tagged a great white shark off the coast of southwest Nova Scotia, a first in Atlantic Canada waters.

Bite into the story >

Resilient reefs

Some coral reefs continue to prosper in the face of several threats.

Dive into the story >

A superior purchase

On September 14, the Nature Conservancy of Canada announced its largest conservation project on Lake Superior’s north shore.

Read more here >

 

 

 

Adam Hunter (Photo courtesy of Adam Hunter)

About the Author

Adam Hunter is the editorial coordinator at the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

Read more about Adam Hunter.

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