Enjoy nature indoors

The crew at Shoderee Ranch at Waterton, with the trusty van. (L-R) - Director of Photography - Ann Tipper, Producer - Yvonne Drebert, Director - Zach Melnick (Photo by Larry Drebert)

The crew at Shoderee Ranch at Waterton, with the trusty van. (L-R) - Director of Photography - Ann Tipper, Producer - Yvonne Drebert, Director - Zach Melnick (Photo by Larry Drebert)

While there is nothing like exploring the outdoors firsthand, not everyone has access to a natural area near them. However, you can stay in touch with nature — even experience an Arctic excursion — through films and books, from the comfort of your home.

Check out some of our recommendations for an unforgettable nature experience, below:

Documentaries

The Wild Canadian Year

Presented by The Nature of Things with David Suzuki
Stream for free on CBC TV.

An Academy Award nominee for best science or nature documentary in 2018, this five-part series showcases a broad range of Canadian wildlife through the nurture and harshness of the changing four seasons. If you’re looking to experience a broad range of ecosystems on screen, The Wild Canadian Year is sure to fill you with awe and wonder.

Breaking Ice: The Arctic Uncovered

Christopher Paetkau and Sira Chayer
Coming soon.

Take a mind-blowing Arctic adventure aboard an icebreaker ship without leaving the comfort of your home. Unlike a normal movie-watching experience, this is a virtual reality experience where you are the main character. With a 360o view of the Arctic, you can witness the fragility of this ecosystem under changing climate conditions.

Backus Woods, Ontario (Photo by NCC)

Backus Woods, Ontario (Photo by NCC)

Striking Balance

Stream for free on TVO.

An exploration of Canada’s UNESCO Biosphere Reserves from coast to coast, Striking Balance shows nature as a concept that includes people and the shared relationship between them. The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) was an active supporter of this documentary, and the producer had written an account of the challenges faced during filming on our blog. One episode of the documentary features beautiful, scenic shots of NCC’s Backus Woods property, in Ontario.

Books

The Animals in that Country

Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood is recognized as one of Canada’s greatest contemporary writers. Her literary contributions rest not only in novels, but also in poetry and short stories. Her early works are featured in a poetry collection from 1968 — The Animals in that Country. It sets the tone for the relationships between humans and nature that are portrayed in her future works.

Nature Power: In the Spirit of an Okanagan Storyteller

Harry Robinson

Harry Robinson, a famed Okanagan storyteller, wanted to pass on a legacy of oral storytelling that he experienced as a child. In this collection of oral stories, you can immerse yourself in a world of nature helpers —  beings that assist humans and give powers. Robinson’s creative prose describes a place where humans and the natural world share an intertwined relationship.

Mike and Barb's lunch spot at Sage and Sparrow Conservation Area (Photo by NCC)

Mike and Barb's lunch spot at Sage and Sparrow Conservation Area (Photo by NCC)

Throughout the book, there are references to Robinson’s birthplace: the Similkameen Valley of southern British Columbia. To this day, the landscape described in his stories is still under protection. NCC is actively working to restore grassland ecosystems and native species in the Similkameen Valley, namely the Sage and Sparrow Conservation Area.

The Curve of Time: The Classic Memoir of a Woman and Her Children Who Explored the Coastal Waters of the Pacific Northwest

M. Wylie Blanchet

In the 1920s, M. Wylie Blanchet, along her five children, engaged in a pioneering “family trip” along the West Coast of Canada. She recounts her family’s experiences with nature, be it with violent waters or in calm forests. This biography is an account of both outdoor adventure and spiritual growth. Travel blog fans will enjoy this famous, classic book about British Columbia.

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