Burrowing owls (Photo by Don Dabbs)

Burrowing owls (Photo by Don Dabbs)

Conservation 101

  • GIS in conservation 101

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are computer-based analysis and management tools that not only store data, but also store real-world locations that each individual datum refers to.

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  • How does NCC calculate the value of the land?

    The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) only acquires properties from willing landowners. When acquiring lands for conservation purposes, NCC must compete on the open market against other interests, such as farming, forestry or development.

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  • Invasive alien species 101

    Invasive alien species are plants, animals and micro-organisms that are not native to an area but have been introduced to it, either intentionally or by other means.

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  • Land use

    Access on lands owned or held under conservation agreement (easement/covenant/servitude) by NCC

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  • Native gardening 101

    By introducing native plants and some strategic design features to your garden, you can provide patches of natural habitat for many species. A well-designed backyard can offer birds and pollinators like butterflies, more living space, feeding opportunities and the safety of cover from predators.

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  • Natural corridors 101

    Part of a species' ability to adapt to environmental change is the opportunity to move to places that are more suitable. That's where natural corridors come in.

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  • Old-growth forests 101

    When thinking about healthy forests, it's not often we include dead, dying or diseased trees. But any forest manager will tell you that they're an essential part of a healthy forest ecosystem, and a key characteristic of old-growth.

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  • Species at Risk 101

    Species at risk are plants and animals that are in danger of disappearing from the wild.

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  • Wetlands 101

    Wetlands are unique nutrient-rich ecosystems where terrestrial and aquatic habitats meet. They are formed when water is trapped through poor drainage, occasional flooding or coastal barriers such as sandbars.

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