Pine Butte Ranch

Pine Butte Ranch

A meeting of minds in Cranbrook

Bob Redgate, Linda Hannah, Nathalie Pratt and John Lounds at the NCC National Board Meeting, October 2014 (Photo by Barry Coulter)

Bob Redgate, Linda Hannah, Nathalie Pratt and John Lounds at the NCC National Board Meeting, October 2014 (Photo by Barry Coulter)

Even though the Nature Conservancy of Canada's (NCC's) work is all about conserving the outside world, sometimes we have to spend a few days inside, putting our heads together to come up with the best way to conserve Canada's most iconic landscapes before they are lost or transformed by human development.

This October, NCC's National Board of Directors gathered in Cranbrook, British Columbia, to chart a strong course forward in the organization's efforts to protect habitat for at least a quarter of Canada's species at risk.

Directors from science and business communities across the country were excited to come Cranbrook (in BC's East Kootenay region), in part because of the significant conservation success that NCC has seen in this area of the province. Our Canadian Rockies program has been the engine behind such important projects as Darkwoods, Columbia Lake – Lot 48, Mount Broadwood and Pine Butte Ranch. 

Looking down Columbia Lake Valley from the Dutch Creek Hoodoos (Photo by NCC)

Looking down Columbia Lake Valley from the Dutch Creek Hoodoos (Photo by NCC)

“NCC's conservation planning has identified the most important areas for conservation, such as the Canadian Rockies, where wide-ranging animals such as grizzlies, wolverine, moose and elk still have room to roam,” says Bob Redgate, BC Chair, Nature Conservancy of Canada. “As a Board Director with NCC, I stand behind the practical, business-like approach we are taking to conserve this country's most iconic and ecologically important landscapes.”

Joe Pierre shares the Ktunaxa creation story at Columbia Lake - Lot 48 (Photo by NCC)

Joe Pierre shares the Ktunaxa creation story at Columbia Lake - Lot 48 (Photo by NCC)

Over three days, NCC's volunteer Board of Directors, which is made up of representatives from all across Canada, took part in business and committee meetings. The group capped off their work with a field trip to NCC's conservation projects in the Columbia Valley.

Directors heard from local NCC program staff and were given a hands-on opportunity to learn more about NCC's efforts in the East Kootenay and our success in protecting wildlife corridors for migratory birds, large mammals such as wolves, bighorn sheep and grizzly bear, and critically endangered animals such as badger.

“All in all the meetings were a huge success,” said Linda Hannah, BC regional vice president. “Thanks to the thoughtful input and dedication of our Directors, NCC has a strong vision and mandate for conserving the very best of this country's precious natural heritage."

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