Cabot Head shoreline, Northern Bruce Peninsula, ON (Photo by Kas Stone)

Cabot Head shoreline, Northern Bruce Peninsula, ON (Photo by Kas Stone)

Northern Bruce Peninsula Natural Area

Sunset at Hay Bay, Ontario (Photo by Ethan Meleg)

Sunset at Hay Bay, Ontario (Photo by Ethan Meleg)

An ecological gem

World-renowned for its diversity of orchids and ferns, the Northern Bruce Peninsula is one of the best hotspots for biodiversity in the Great Lakes.

Species 

The peninsula supports an abundance of species diversity, including 11 globally rare species such as lakeside daisy, eastern prairie white-fringed orchid, ram's-head lady's-slipper and eastern massasauga.

Habitat

Rare habitat is also found here, including alvars, sand beaches, fens and meadow marshes. Thirteen per cent of the Northern Bruce Peninsula is classified as wetland habitat.

Cabot Head, on the northeastern Bruce Peninsula, is an important stopover site for migratory birds, which gather in globally significant concentrations during their spring and fall migrations. In the spring, red-necked grebes also congregate there in what appears to be their most significant gathering point on the Great Lakes.

Conservation status 

The Northern Bruce Peninsula is one of the most intact natural landscapes in Ontario south of the Canadian Shield. It presents a rare opportunity to conserve a large, functional ecosystem in southern Ontario, which in turn benefits wide-ranging mammals such as fisher.

 The Bruce Peninsula Bird Observatory is a not-for-profit organization created to promote and foster the study, appreciation and conservation of birds and their habitats on the Bruce Peninsula.

NCC also works with Parks Canada to buffer and secure additional lands for Bruce Peninsula National Park.

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