Waves crash on the northwestern Lake Superior coast, ON (Photo by John Anderson)

Waves crash on the northwestern Lake Superior coast, ON (Photo by John Anderson)

Northwestern Lake Superior Coast Natural Area

Waves crash on the northwestern Lake Superior Coast, Ontario (Photo by John Anderson)

Waves crash on the northwestern Lake Superior Coast, Ontario (Photo by John Anderson)

The northwestern shores of Lake Superior are a unique landscape and a key area for Great Lakes biodiversity as well as part of the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area.

Habitat 

Located where the climate is more temperate than the vast boreal zone dominating the north shore of Lake Superior, the area is a transition zone between moist mixed forests to the south and drier boreal forests to the north. Forests with distinctive moss and lichen communities exist throughout this natural area. Within this context, rugged ridges, cliffs and mesas offer extreme south and north-facing microclimates.

Moderated by the largest lake in the world, coastal splash lines and ice-scoured exposed bedrock support plant communities that followed the glacial retreat. Raised boulder beaches and coastal wetlands offer yet another layer of habitat complexity.

Species 

This unique meeting place between north and south supports many species and community types that are globally rare. Many of the globally rare community types and disjunct species in the study area occur in arcticalpine disjunct associations. These are glacial relict communities that have been able to persist along the relatively cold shores of Lake Superior.

This region still supports many species of wide-ranging mammals, such as gray wolf and Canada lynx, although woodland caribou are now extirpated here. The shoreline areas of Lake Superior are important stopover sites for migrating waterfowl, shorebirds, colonial nesting waterbirds and land birds.

History

The Northwestern Lake Superior Coast Natural Area is a landscape rich with history as a primary North American trade and transportation route through which humans have passed for more than 4,000 years.

Check out this video of our most recent project in the Northwestern Lake Superior Coast Natural Area: Wilson Island.

 

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