Just mad about the Mad River

Just mad about the Mad River

Where land and water meet

Celebrate World Water Day with NCC by learning more about the Minesing Wetlands

Willow Creek, Minesing Wetlands, ON (Photo by Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority)

Willow Creek, Minesing Wetlands, ON (Photo by Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority)

Wetland complexes are unique ecosystems areas where land and water meet, creating one of the most productive habitats in North America for vulnerable plant and animal species. For many years, wetlands were thought of as wastelands, but they provide important ecological services. Among their many roles, wetlands slow drainage flows from developed areas, both urban and rural. This reduces flooding, filters out pollutants and traps sediments. The importance of conserving these areas is becoming increasingly apparent.

Minesing Wetlands is one of the largest and least disturbed wetlands in southern Ontario. It is a primary migratory route for fish species such as threatened lake sturgeon, provides spawning grounds for game fish such as walleye and supports nesting species like Canada geese and mallards. Minesing Wetlands is also home to one of the largest and oldest great blue heron colonies in Ontario as well as the at-risk eastern prairie fringed orchid.

Minesing provides flood protection, functioning like a huge sponge, annually collecting spring flood waters and slowly releasing them to downstream reaches of the Nottawasaga River.

Celebrate World Water Day with NCC by learning more about the Minesing Wetlands >

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