Eastern mountain avens, Big Pond, Nova Scotia (Photo by June Swift)

Eastern mountain avens, Big Pond, Nova Scotia (Photo by June Swift)

Letter from the Editor

Prairie crocus finishes flowering in early May (Photo by Diana Robson)

Prairie crocus finishes flowering in early May (Photo by Diana Robson)

Helping hands

There’s always something new to learn about the natural world when you work for a conservation organization. While producing the spring 2018 issue of the Nature Conservancy of Canada Magazine, for instance, I learned that 800 migratory bird species benefit from legal acts and conventions set in place more than 100 years ago by Canada and the U.S. Each spring, as many of these species return to Canadian soil to breed and nest, Conservation Volunteers for the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) travel to NCC properties from coast to coast. Volunteers of all ages lend a hand to help ensure these properties are safe and in good condition for the birds’ arrival. You can be a part of those efforts by signing up for an event at conservationvolunteers.ca.

In this issue, you’ll also read about our efforts to protect habitat for globally rare species at risk, such as the Poweshiek skipperling butterfly. Once a common species, it’s now rarer than a panda; scientists are in a race against the clock to understand why it is declining. In our Force For Nature story, we introduce you to ranchers Scott and Julia Palmer, who talked to us about their connection to the land and the impact of their conservation agreement with NCC. And find out how citizen scientists in Quebec can now be a part of helping turtle species such as the snapping turtle.

As the snow melts in coming weeks and signs of spring begin to emerge, we encourage you to share your first signs of spring with us. You’ll find more information on our #NCCEarlyBirds photo contest on page 6 of this issue.

Thank you as always for your support of our work.

Christine Beevis Trickett

Director, Editorial Services

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