What’s your Nature Score?

This summer, NCC is launching Nature Score, a program that lets you discover how connected you are to nature. (Photo by iStock)

This summer, NCC is launching Nature Score, a program that lets you discover how connected you are to nature. (Photo by iStock)

Take the quiz and find out how connected you are to the natural world

This summer, the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is launching Nature Score, a program that lets you discover how connected you are to nature. The program draws on the research of Lisa Nisbet, associate professor in the psychology department at Trent University, in Ontario. Being connected to nature isn’t just about a love of nature; it’s about understanding our interdependence with the natural world and the importance of all aspects of nature, not just the beautiful or useful parts.

Have we piqued your curiosity? Great! To determine your Nature Score, you’ll be asked to answer a short quiz, which is based on a more extensive questionnaire originally developed by Nisbet and her colleagues. Once you receive your score, you’ll be assigned a friendly virtual Nature Coach. The coach will help you to improve your score with tips in weekly emails.

According to some theorists, humans are born with an innate connection to nature. But this connection must be nurtured. “The need to encourage Canadians to enhance their relationships with nature has never been as urgent as it is today,” says Erica Thompson, senior director of engagement for the Nature Conservancy of Canada. “Today, many children are growing up without having experiences in nature. Researchers are finding that they may be less likely to care about nature in the same way as previous generations.”

If we want to conserve more natural places faster, people must be aware of the benefits of conservation, not only for nature but also for themselves. Which brings us back to Nature Score. “By encouraging more people to improve their Nature Score and deepen their connection to nature, we believe we will have a better chance of improving their understanding of nature’s benefits,” says Thompson.

This is an excerpt of a story that first appeared in the summer 2019 issue of the Nature Conservancy of Canada Magazine. Donors who contribute at least $25 or more per year will receive four issues of the magazine. Click here to donate today and start receiving the magazine.

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