New Brunswick

Most NCC properties are now open to the public. Please respect physical distancing when visiting our natural areas, and consult our website for site-specific updates.  Learn more >

Since 1989, the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) has been working to conserve New Brunswick’s most significant natural areas. Based in Fredericton, NCC has created more than 40 nature reserves — from the Acadian Peninsula in the north, to the island of Grand Manan in the south. To date, with the help of conservation-minded landowners and community supporters, we’ve protected more than 8,925 hectares (22,054 acres) of this province's most ecologically significant habitats.

Plan a visit to our most popular nature reserves:

  • Johnson’s Mills Shorebird Interpretive Centre near Sackville
  • Musquash Estuary Nature Reserve near Saint John
  • Grand Manan Migratory Bird Sanctuary

Interested in hands-on conservation? Get involved in NCC’s Conservation Volunteers program.

Stories from the Field

Denise Roy, NB Conservation Representative

Denise Roy, NB Conservation Representative

An Internship Turns into 20 Years with NCC

Twenty years since she started as an intern with NCC, Denise Roy still has a passion for nature. Continue Reading »

Semipalmated sandpiper (Photo by NCC)

Semipalmated sandpiper (Photo by NCC)

Everything you need to know for safe and positive shorebird viewing

When bird watching at important shorebirds habitat, remember to keep your distance, don't bring pets, walk softly, keep noise and activity levels low and don't litter. Continue Reading »

From Our Blog

Opegrapha parmeliiperda, cross section of one fruiting body showing four-celled spores developing inside spore sacs; blue colour result of treatment with potassium hydroxide followed by Lugol’s iodine solution. (Photo courtesy of Kendra Driscoll)

Opegrapha parmeliiperda, cross section of one fruiting body showing four-celled spores developing inside spore sacs; blue colour result of treatment with potassium hydroxide followed by Lugol’s iodine solution. (Photo courtesy of Kendra Driscoll)

Discoveries in little-known fungi: Adventures in looking at lichens

September 20, 2021

I used to think that scientists understood the basics about most living things on Earth, that new species were all discovered long ago by people like Linnaeus and Darwin. Maybe you could find new species in the most remote corners of the planet,... Continue Reading »

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