Quebec

The Nature Conservancy of Canada's (NCC's) first project in Quebec was the Heikalo (Île aux Moutons) property in 1978. The seven-acre (three-hectare) island is located east of Montreal. Since then, we have completed more than 300 projects on more than 111,000 acres (45,000 hectares). We aim to protect Quebec’s most ecologically significant lands and waters. Thanks to this work, 200 at-risk plant and animal species have now protected habitats. NCC continues to work with our partners to protect and steward Quebec's natural heritage. We work in 15 priority natural areas across the province.

Stories from the Field

Northern pitcher plant, Lac-à-la-Tortue bog (Photo by Martin Beaulieu)

Northern pitcher plant, Lac-à-la-Tortue bog (Photo by Martin Beaulieu)

In the depths of the Lac-à-la-Tortue bog

Peatlands are wetlands composed of plant residues accumulated over the centuries. Although they are widespread in the Quebec landscape, they remain unknown to a large part of the population. Yet they provide us with many essential ecological services and are valuable allies in the fight against climate change through their role in carbon capture. Continue Reading »

Common gartersnake (Photo by Hugo Tremblay-CERFO)

Common gartersnake (Photo by Hugo Tremblay-CERFO)

A cozy nest for common gartersnake

The transformation of natural environments has an impact on the needs of species. Gartersnakes that have taken up residence on agricultural land, for example, may need a little help to get through the winter. This is where NCC comes in. Continue Reading »

From Our Blog

Common gartersnake (Photo by Hugo Tremblay-CERFO)

Common gartersnake (Photo by Hugo Tremblay-CERFO)

A cozy nest for a common gartersnake

February 9, 2019

You won’t be surprised to hear that my fellow scientists spend a lot of time in the field in the spring and summer (for species inventories, invasive species control, property monitoring, etc.), but when the snow flies and temperatures drop... Continue Reading »

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Atlantic puffins (Photo by Bill Caulfield-Browne)