L-R: John Patten, Robert Patten, Susan Patten, Allan Patten (Photo courtesy of the Patten family)

L-R: John Patten, Robert Patten, Susan Patten, Allan Patten (Photo courtesy of the Patten family)

Patten Family Foundation

All in the family

He may only be four years old, but Carey Patten vividly sums up one of the biggest reasons why his family supports the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC):

“I love running on the trails in nature. I love watching the birds, and I pretend I have wings too,” he laughs.

The Patten Family has been a generous NCC supporter for the last decade, first through their company, A. Harvey & Company Limited, and now through the Patten Family Foundation. Their latest gift in support of the Landmark Campaign helped to establish the 98-hectare (243-acre) Freshwater Bay Nature Reserve, just minutes from St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador — the very spot where Carey likes to run and play.

“Our grandkids love exploring in the forested areas, picking out the trees with the largest trunk or the one with the oddest shape,” says Robert Patten, who co-leads the foundation with his mother, Susan Patten, Carey’s great-grandmother. “It’s easy to assume the nature they love so much will always be there, but I try to teach them if it’s not taken care of, it won’t be there for their children to enjoy.”

Freshwater Bay is an ideal setting for nature’s lessons. A former fishing settlement, it features a coastal lagoon and rock cliffs with countless seabirds. The surrounding boreal forests and wetlands include a spectacular section of the East Coast Trail.

“Giving back to the community has been part of our family business for 150 years,” explains Susan. “We are proud to be part of a project that protects the beauty of our coastline, while providing access to trails, ocean and wildlife for our community to explore and enjoy.”

The Patten Family Foundation is a generous supporter of the Landmark Campaign. Learn more about the campaign and what you helped accomplish, here >

Supporter Spotlight

Gifts of Canadian Nature