British Columbia

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The Nature Conservancy of Canada's (NCC's) first project in British Columbia was to help with the acquisition of Mud Bay in 1974 — a vibrant intertidal property in Vancouver's Boundary Bay. Since then, we have completed more than 100 projects that protect more than 820,000 hectares (2,000,000 acres) of the province's most ecologically significant land and water. Today, the BC Region continues to work with our partners to protect and steward British Columbia's natural heritage. This work is focussed in 11 priority natural areas across the province.

Stories from the Field

Pair of Williamson's sapsucker (Photo by Patty McGann)

Pair of Williamson's sapsucker (Photo by Patty McGann)

Home is where the heart rot is

Imagine being so particular about the house you can live in that if your home were destroyed it would take centuries to build a new one. For old-growth-forest-dependent species like Williamson’s sapsucker, this is exactly the situation they face. Continue Reading »

Volunteers at James Island (Photo by NCC)

Volunteers at James Island (Photo by NCC)

The secret life of common garden plants

In the spirit of national Invasive Species Awareness Week, the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s stewardship coordinators in BC are sharing some notable troublesome invasive plants that they manage on our conservation lands. Continue Reading »

From Our Blog

The cough drop-sized parasite Griffen's isopod, native to Asia and Russia, has decimated mud shrimp populations along the West Coast. The parasite on the right is a female with the much smaller male attached. (Florida Museum photo by Amanda Bemis and Gustav Paulay)

The cough drop-sized parasite Griffen's isopod, native to Asia and Russia, has decimated mud shrimp populations along the West Coast. The parasite on the right is a female with the much smaller male attached. (Florida Museum photo by Amanda Bemis and Gustav Paulay)

Invasive, shrimp-sucking parasite continues northward Pacific expansion

September 29, 2020

By Josh Silberg and Natalie van Hoose Researchers have identified an invasive, blood-sucking parasite on mud shrimp in the waters of British Columbia’s Calvert Island. The discovery represents the northernmost record of the parasite on the... Continue Reading »

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