Saskatchewan

The Nature Conservancy of Canada's (NCC's) first project in Saskatchewan occurred in 1982 with the acquisition of 157 acres (64 hectares) in Qu’Appelle Coulee, located 15 kilometres (10 miles) North of Wolseley in southern Saskatchewan. This area consists of upland native grassland, mature American elm, Manitoba maple and green ash along the coulee. When acquired, this area was the second ecological reserve in the province. Since then, NCC has completed more than 205 projects in Saskatchewan and is conserving more than 150,000 acres (60,703 hectares) of the province’s most ecologically significant land and water. The Saskatchewan Region continues to work with its partners to protect and steward Saskatchewan's natural heritage.

Stories from the Field

Jean Kendall (left) and her 10-year-old granddaughter Tanaeya Kring walk through the fields of grasslands at NCC's Old Man on His Back site. (Photo by Mark Taylor)

Jean Kendall (left) and her 10-year-old granddaughter Tanaeya Kring walk through the fields of grasslands at NCC's Old Man on His Back site. (Photo by Mark Taylor)

Grandmother-granddaughter duo travel 2,500 km to visit NCC grassland property

A grandmother and her granddaughter traveled from northern Ontario to southwest Saskatchewan to see NCC's Old Man on His Back property. Continue Reading »

Robin Poitras jingles bells on her knees as part of a dance performance at NCC's Fairy Hill. (Photo by NCC)

Robin Poitras jingles bells on her knees as part of a dance performance at NCC's Fairy Hill. (Photo by NCC)

Culture and dance brought to Fairy Hill conservation site

Grasslands are important for nature conservation, but they are also an important part of human history. Dancers helped add to the culture that has been at NCC's Fairy Hill for centuries. Continue Reading »

From Our Blog

Woman, wearing a large feathered hat and boa, posing for a portrait (Photo by John Oxley Library, Public Domain)

The Migratory Bird Treaty turns 100!

August 16, 2016

This year we mark the centennial of the convention between the United States and Great Britain (for Canada) for the protection of migratory birds — also called the Migratory Bird Treaty — that was signed on August 16, 1916. A century... Continue Reading »

Supporter Spotlight

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