Something's Fishy: An impending invader

Northern snakehead (Photo by National Aquarium, Washington, DC)

I have an inherent fear of the dark. I’m not ashamed to admit that, without the company of my snoring pug, Molly, taking up half of my bed, I need to sleep with the light on. It’s not so much the darkness that scares me; it’s the...

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What's ahead for NCC in 2017?

Family hiking near the mountains (Photo courtesy ParticipACTION)

Family hiking near the mountains (Photo courtesy ParticipACTION)

Conservation has always been a diplomatic balance between fear and hope. Too much fear, and our actions seem futile. Too much hope, and optimism may blind us. There is fear over the state of nature in Canada. Loss of habitats and species, climate...

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How we can save our songbirds

Cerulean warbler (Photo by Bill Hubick)

Cerulean warbler (Photo by Bill Hubick)

By now, I'm hoping that many of you have heard about declining songbird populations and the numerous threats that these birds face, which are, typically, physical threats to their survival. However, I’d like to discuss a different type of...

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What the knowledge of how trees communicate means for forest conservation

A shady Douglas-fir forest (Photo by Jenny McCune)

A shady Douglas-fir forest (Photo by Jenny McCune)

Japanese people are generally familiar with shinrin-yoku or forest bathing — the practice of being immersed in a forest. In Germany, the concept is referred to as Waldsehligkeit, a feeling of profound well-being that comes from being...

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Five of nature's most fascinating families

Orca (Photo by Tim Ennis/NCC)

Orca, Salish Sea, BC (Photo by NCC)

If you thought human families were the only relatives with complex relationships, think again. In honour of Family Day, check out some of the animal kingdom’s fascinating families below: Orcas Orcas (also known as killer whales) are...

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Love wood and still be a forest hugger

Winter trail, Eastcourt, March 13, 1937 (Photo by Marion Ellis)

Winter trail, Eastcourt, March 13, 1937 (Photo by Marion Ellis)

You have probably bought forest products like lumber for a home reno or notepaper for school supplies and wondered how your purchase affects the forest it came from. You may feel guilty, but you shouldn’t if the forest products you buy are...

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Heard it from a Scout: A beginner's guide to winter camping

Scouts pitch insulated tents to keep warm in winter. (Photo by Scouts Canada)

During the winter months, most Canadians dream of flying south to escape the snow, ice and below-zero temperatures. Scouts, on the other hand, like to get outside by heading to campgrounds to enjoy all that nature has to offer. A scout’s...

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Out of sight, out of mind

Greater sage-grouse (Photo by Gordon Sherman © Audubon Canyon Ranch)

Now and then, I look out my living room window and begin to search. I am not searching for anything in particular, it is simply by habit. I can spend 20, or even 30, minutes just gazing here and there at just about anything. Little brown birds...

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Why Canada matters on World Wetlands Day

Wetlands in the Marion Creek Benchlands, British Columbia (Photo by Tim Ennis/NCC)

Wetlands in the Marion Creek Benchlands, British Columbia (Photo by Tim Ennis/NCC)

While other nations have picked wetland wildlife, such as Finland’s whooper swan or Pakistan’s Indus crocodile, to represent their country, Canada is the only country in the world that has selected a wetland engineer as its national...

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January roundup: Conservation and nature stories that caught our eye this month

Sperm whale (Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

For 2017, the Land Lines team at the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) decided to forgo our usual weekly roundup in favour of a monthly compilation of the best nature and conservation stories floating around on the World Wide Web.Every day,...

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