Invasive, shrimp-sucking parasite continues northward Pacific expansion

The cough drop-sized parasite Griffen's isopod, native to Asia and Russia, has decimated mud shrimp populations along the West Coast. The parasite on the right is a female with the much smaller male attached. (Florida Museum photo by Amanda Bemis and Gustav Paulay)

The cough drop-sized parasite Griffen's isopod, native to Asia and Russia, has decimated mud shrimp populations along the West Coast. The parasite on the right is a female with the much smaller male attached. (Florida Museum photo by Amanda Bemis and Gustav Paulay)

By Josh Silberg and Natalie van Hoose Researchers have identified an invasive, blood-sucking parasite on mud shrimp in the waters of British Columbia’s Calvert Island. The discovery represents the northernmost record of the parasite on the...

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Tackling invasive European common reed

Me on a six-foot ladder amidst European common reed, to illustrate its height and density. (Photo by Courtney Robichaud)

Me on a six-foot ladder amidst European common reed, to illustrate its height and density. (Photo by Courtney Robichaud)

The highs and lows of monitoring the large-scale suppression of Phragmites australis spp. australis My field crew and I are covered in scratches. I’m a PhD student studying the recovery of native vegetation after invasive species control,...

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Murder hornets: What’s all the buzz about?

Asian giant hornets have orange-yellow heads and alternating bands of black, orange and yellow. (Photo by Yasunori Koide, Wikimedia Commons)

Asian giant hornets have orange-yellow heads and alternating bands of black, orange and yellow. (Photo by Yasunori Koide, Wikimedia Commons)

If you’ve been following the news this summer, you’re sure to have seen mention of murder hornets. After isolated discoveries of this invasive species in British Columbia and Washington state, news about the Asian giant hornet has...

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Be on the lookout for these eight common invasive species

Purple loosestrife (Photo by Liz West, Wikimedia Commons)

Purple loosestrife (Photo by Liz West, Wikimedia Commons)

Spending all this time at home has helped me realize something: I’ve been in denial about the invasive plants growing around my home. The little patch of garlic mustard by our front steps, which I’m sure came from seeds on my boots...

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Could there be an invasive species in your backyard?

Person taking picture of a plant (Photo by iStock)

Person taking picture of a plant (Photo by iStock)

The changing of the seasons in Canada brings back some of our most beloved species. Migratory birds fly back north, our gardens come alive and buds reappear on the trees. However, the warming weather can also bring some less-than-desirable...

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The race against rats: The most successful invasive species in the world

Brown rat (Photo by Dunpharlain, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0)

Brown rat (Photo by Dunpharlain, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0)

Everyone has a rat story, except for, maybe, Albertans (the lucky ones); I’ll explain why in a bit. In Hong Kong, where I grew up, rats and mice were collectively called lo shu in Cantonese. The term was probably tossed around by parents to...

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Tracing the roots of invasive species

A murmuration of starlings (Photo by John Holmes, Wikimedia Commons)

A murmuration of starlings (Photo by John Holmes, Wikimedia Commons)

In the media world of conservation, there seems to be no shortage of news on invasive species — plants, animals and organisms that were introduced (accidentally or deliberately) to an area outside of their native range and where their...

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What happens to invasive species in the winter?

Second-year garlic mustard plant (Photo courtesy Invasive Species Centre)

Second-year garlic mustard plant (Photo courtesy Invasive Species Centre)

With winter arriving in Canada, the scenery of fully leafed plants and active wildlife transitions to quiet, snowy winters. With this change in seasons, invasive species may become out of sight and out of mind. But they always seem to come back...

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Having a field day

Crane River Tract, ON (Photo by NCC)

Crane River Tract, ON (Photo by NCC)

This summer, I spent a few days volunteering with the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC). My family owns a cottage on the Bruce Peninsula, so we are close to several NCC properties. My dad already knew Esme Batten, NCC’s coordinator of...

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Living out my passion for conservation

Brock Hussey (Photo by NCC)

Brock Hussey (Photo by NCC)

I have always had a passion for nature, like many people in the conservation field. Growing up, I was always outside, surrounded by nature, observing the plants and animals around me. It wasn’t often you would find me without my eyes glued...

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