Indigenous rights and private land conservation: Opening the door to collective responsibility

The sun setting on a prairie of wildflowers at Old Man on His Back Prairie and Heritage Conservation Area in southern Saskatchewan. The Nature Conservancy of Canada has been engaging with a group of Indigenous advisors from local nations to develop a Bison Management Plan for these lands, which are part of the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi, Nakoda, Dakota, Lakota, Anishnaabe, and Nêhiyawak Peoples as well as the homeland of the Métis. (Photo by Jason Bantle)

The sun setting on a prairie of wildflowers at Old Man on His Back Prairie and Heritage Conservation Area in southern Saskatchewan. The Nature Conservancy of Canada has been engaging with a group of Indigenous advisors from local nations to develop a Bison Management Plan for these lands, which are part of the traditional territories of the Niitsitapi, Nakoda, Dakota, Lakota, Anishnaabe, and Nêhiyawak Peoples as well as the homeland of the Métis. (Photo by Jason Bantle)

This blog is an accompaniment to a report by Conservation through Reconciliation Partnership entitled: Respect and Responsibility: Integrating Indigenous Rights and Private Land Conservation in Canada. A Guide for Land Trusts and Other...

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The best free nature apps

Engaging with nature doesn't mean you have to put down your phone (Photo by ©ysbrandcosijnfotografie via Canva)

Engaging with nature doesn't mean you have to put down your phone (Photo by ©ysbrandcosijnfotografie via Canva)

Some nature lovers may find technology and the natural world at odds. How can you enjoy tranquility with the ping of your smartphone? While nature may be a refuge to unplug, I would like to present an alternative view. Apps and the technology that...

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What’s that stuff on my tree? A guide to Manitoba’s lichens

Lichen on tree (Photo courtesy of Manitoba Museum)

Lichen on tree (Photo courtesy of Manitoba Museum)

If you’re an observant person, you may have noticed colourful things growing on Manitoba’s trees and rocks. Although some of these organisms are mosses (especially near the base), they are more likely to be lichens. Bright orange...

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Discoveries in little-known fungi: Adventures in looking at lichens

Opegrapha parmeliiperda, cross section of one fruiting body showing four-celled spores developing inside spore sacs; blue colour result of treatment with potassium hydroxide followed by Lugol’s iodine solution. (Photo courtesy of Kendra Driscoll)

Opegrapha parmeliiperda, cross section of one fruiting body showing four-celled spores developing inside spore sacs; blue colour result of treatment with potassium hydroxide followed by Lugol’s iodine solution. (Photo courtesy of Kendra Driscoll)

I used to think that scientists understood the basics about most living things on Earth, that new species were all discovered long ago by people like Linnaeus and Darwin. Maybe you could find new species in the most remote corners of the planet,...

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The importance of being a flower

Western red lily has one of the largest flowers in Manitoba. (Photo courtesy of Manitoba Museum)

Western red lily has one of the largest flowers in Manitoba. (Photo courtesy of Manitoba Museum)

Like many of you, I enjoy walking through my neighbourhood and smelling the sweet fragrances of the summer flowers. Unfortunately, like many things, flowers are ephemeral. When I see a flower, I am always reminded of the Robert Herrick poem urging...

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The Wildflower Blog: Three favourite wildflowers to grow

Bloodroot (Photo by Thomas Noland)

Bloodroot (Photo by Thomas Noland)

Bloodroot, Dutchman's breeches and Virginia bluebells are three lovely spring-blooming wildflowers that are worthy of any flower garden, not just a wildflower garden. In my garden, its always a race between bloodroot and Dutchman's breeches for...

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The calming effects of natural soundscapes

Birds, wind, rain – these sounds enrich our experience of natural landscapes. (Photo by André Cook, Pexels)

Birds, wind, rain – these sounds enrich our experience of natural landscapes. (Photo by André Cook, Pexels)

Birds chirping, wind brushing through treetops, the babble of running water — nature’s music is abundant and has long been a source of comfort for humanity. Shakespeare noted the beauty of nature’s sounds in The Tempest: The...

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An introduction to the science of bird migration in Canada

Palm warbler (Photo by Marshall Faintich)

Palm warbler (Photo by Marshall Faintich)

Birds move. Actually, they do better than that: most birds fly. And the distances these tiny creatures can cover is jaw-dropping. On top of that, can you imagine the views from a bird's vantage point as it flies from South America to Canada?...

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5 ways insects make our world a better place

Dragonfly at Carden Alvar, ON (Photo by NCC)

Dragonfly at Carden Alvar, ON (Photo by NCC)

There are an estimated 10 quintillion individual insects on Earth. That’s 19 zeroes after the one! Insects make up 75 per cent of all animals. Despite their ubiquity, they have a PR problem. People often find them gross, scary or even...

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Our treasured islands of Mahone Bay

Saling on Mahone Bay, NS (Photo by MICA)

Saling on Mahone Bay, NS (Photo by MICA)

Imagine looking out from a shoreline and seeing beautiful pristine islands nearby. To row, paddle or sail to an island and find it in its natural state is not a dream in the waters of Mahone Bay, southwest Nova Scotia; it is a reality where you...

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