So many species, so many ways to study them

Spotted salamander (Photo by Rosemary Mosco)

I have the best job in the world. I encourage people to get excited about nature. I’m a science communicator — someone who bridges the gap between scientists, the media and the public, helping us understand each other better. One way...

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Heard it from a Scout: How climate change affects maple syrup production

Scouts pouring hot maple syrup on snow to make maple taffy (Photo by Andrea Burbidge Photography)

Climate change is one of the great challenges of this century. From major natural disasters to large-scale shifts in weather, it's easy to forget about the other ways that climate change is affecting our world. One is on our breakfast...

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Recovering the American chestnut

American Chestnut (Photo by Norfolk County)

American Chestnut (Photo by Norfolk County)

The Canadian Chestnut Council (CCC) is a volunteer-run scientific and charitable organization. Now in its 29th year, CCC's goal is to save the endangered American chestnut from extinction. The American chestnut was once the dominant hardwood...

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Look for these first signs of spring across Canada

Red-winged blackbird (Photo by Bill Hubick)

Red-winged blackbird (Photo by Bill Hubick)

With the springing forward of our clocks and increased daylight, many Canadians are getting antsy for the arrival of spring, perhaps especially for our friends in the Atlantic provinces (darn you, Nor’easter!). What can be more delightful...

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Climate change, fire and their implications for species

Will forest fire hazard signs be over into the red more often because of climate change? (Photo by Aaron H Warren CC BY-ND 2.0)

The role of fire in forest ecosystems Forest fires are powerful and devastating. But they are also necessary for the rejuvenation of some ecosystems. Many plants are well adapted to fire. Some trees have dense bark or shed their lower limbs to...

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Heard it from a Scout: Lessons learned while tree planting in Fort McMurray

St. Albert and Fort McMurray Scouts planting a symbolic tree (Photo by Shayne Kawalilak)

In early 2017, my mom presented an idea to our St. Albert, Alberta, Scout troop — an idea that I didn’t realize would result in our small group doing something really big. My mom is a leader with Scouts Canada and she planted a seed...

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Manitoba's amazing ash forests, invasive emerald ash borer and how you can help

Emerald ash borer adult (Photo by by U.S. Department of Agriculture)

Emerald ash borer adult (Photo by by U.S. Department of Agriculture)

Buy local. Burn local. Don’t move firewood. This is not just another green slogan put out by conservationists in the new year. Allow us to explain… Many people have heard about how non-native invasive species, including insects and...

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The Sapling: Q&A with Jessie Klassen

Jessie Klassen, author of <i>The Sapling</i>.

When a tiny maple seed becomes a Sapling, she discovers there’s much about life that she doesn’t know or understand. This fear stunts her growth, and she becomes too afraid to continue her life cycle — until she meets Big...

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Christmas trees make a great cup of tea

White spruce with cones (Photo by Manitoba Museum)

Every day, the Google search engine is inundated with searches for the next superfood, health trend or nutritional qualities of certain foods. Sadly, very few people know that you can make a beverage high in vitamin C from...Christmas...

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Heard it from a Scout: Sumac is nature's tasty candy

Staghorn sumac (Photo by Kaelem Moniz)

In my first year of Scouts, I went on a hike with my troop and discovered a strange-looking plant. One of the senior Scouts told everyone that it was called staghorn sumac and that it was like “nature’s sour candy.” I tried it...

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