Common ground conservation

Downtown Vancouver (Photo by Adam Hunter/NCC staff)

Downtown Vancouver (Photo by Adam Hunter/NCC staff)

We’re currently running one of the world’s biggest experiments. You’re part of it, and I’m part of it. For the first time in the history of modern humans, we’ve attempted to detach ourselves, and our children, from...

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What do we save? How science and planning are evolving to help make critical conservation decisions

Participants of the Open Standards workshop led by the Conservation Coaches Network (Photo by NCC)

Participants of the Open Standards workshop led by the Conservation Coaches Network (Photo by NCC)

In a world that is rapidly losing wildlife and habitats, conservation has become a science of decision-making. We know there are many places and species in Canada that will not survive unless we take action to protect and restore them. Deciding...

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International Day of Biological Diversity: A thank you note to Algonquin Park

Joe Lake, Algonquin Provincial Park (Photo by Brett Hodnett/Wikimedia Commons)

Joe Lake, Algonquin Provincial Park (Photo by Brett Hodnett/Wikimedia Commons)

Three. That’s how many Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) supporters recently (within the span of a week) shared with me that their current passion for nature and support for our work at NCC was sparked by spending time in Algonquin Park...

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Think globally, conserve locally

Blanding's turtle (Photo by Gabrielle Fortin)

Blanding's turtle (Photo by Gabrielle Fortin)

At the beginning of May, representatives of 132 governments around the world released a United Nations report that issues a stark warning: the accelerating deterioration of nature is jeopardizing humanity’s collective future. The report is...

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We can recover Canada’s wildlife: Five examples of species NCC is helping save

Small white lady's-slipper (Photo by Melissa Grantham)

Small white lady's-slipper (Photo by Melissa Grantham)

These are tough times for many wildlife species and their habitats. Over three-quarters of Earth’s terrestrial ecosystems (excluding Antarctica) have been directly modified by human activities1 , and most of our shrinking global wilderness...

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World Water Day: Why a burning river should give you hope

Cuyahoga River fire in June 1969 (Photo by USEPA Environmental-Protection-Agency)

Cuyahoga River fire in June 1969 (Photo by USEPA Environmental-Protection-Agency)

There’s a picture of water I think about a lot. It’s not a loon on a misty lake. It’s not the classic Canadian image showing the back of a favourite paddling mate in the bow of a canoe. It’s a picture of a burning...

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What ash trees and bumble bees are telling us

American bumble bee (Photo by K.S. Gardener/iNaturalist)

American bumble bee (Photo by K.S. Gardener/iNaturalist)

Black ash and American bumble bee are not species I thought we would ever need to save. When I started my studies in conservation over 25 years ago, bumble bees still seemed commonplace, and I thought of ash as a common tree that was great for...

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A world without wetlands

Brighton Wetland, Eastern Lake Ontario Coast (Photo by David Coulson)

Brighton Wetland, Eastern Lake Ontario Coast (Photo by David Coulson)

I live next to a swamp. After 20 years of having this swamp as my neighbour, it’s kind of grown on me. I enjoy the spring flush of marsh marigolds, the annual reawakening of spring peepers, and I still smile when I see a colourful wood duck...

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Three lessons about nature from your old Christmas tree

Balsam fir Christmas tree pruning (Photo by Blake Wile/Wikimedia Commons)

Balsam fir Christmas tree pruning (Photo by Blake Wile/Wikimedia Commons)

People living in the Northern Hemisphere have brought trees and boughs into their homes during the winter for thousands of years. The evergreens that we decorate with during Christmas can represent a celebration of holidays and a reminder that...

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No species left behind: Reflections on wildlife conservation for the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s 56th anniversary

Plains bison (Photo by Mark Taylor)

Plains bison (Photo by Mark Taylor)

One hundred and thirty years ago, there was not a single living wild plains bison left in Canada. The planet was a few hundred bulls, cows and calves away from witnessing the extinction of one of North America’s largest living land animals....

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