Earth Day 2018: Buddies, boundaries and nearby nature

Red trillium (Photo by Sherry Nigro)

Earth Day is a good time to think about the future. How do we ensure our children grow up healthy and happy? Research suggests that the answer is right outside our back door: help them connect with nature. Benefits of time in nature Spending...

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Tracking animals by what they leave behind

Fresh coyote scat chock full of deer hair (Photo by Mark Stabb/NCC staff)

Fresh coyote scat chock-full of deer hair (Photo by Mark Stabb/NCC staff)

Wildlife tracking is one of the many fun nature activities you can take part in. One of my favourite pastimes is pointing out something to a friend or family member that they may have never noticed before, especially something left behind by...

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Connect with people and nature through volunteering

Conservation Volunteers planting trees at Swishwash Island, BC (Photo by NCC)

For me, spring is a time of new beginnings. As the ground starts to thaw and we begin to shed our winter layers, the rhythm of the season draws us outdoors, where we can breathe in the fresh spring air. Spring bulbs push their way through the cold...

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Getting my feet wet with field work (literally)

Excited to be in the field (Photo by Lynn Pinnell)

As university students, we learn the theory behind conservation and read journal articles about the findings of studies that took place out in the field, but rarely do we get the chance to participate in real field work. I feel incredibly lucky...

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Plogging: What it is and why you should try it on your next run

Running in nature (Photo from Masterfile)

Plogging, a combination of jogging and picking up litter, is a new trend dashing across the world. Originating in Sweden in 2016, it has now made its way to other parts of the world, including Canada. It began as an organized activity to combat...

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Cruising for birds

Our 14-deck mammoth cruise ship ― Costa Pacifica (Photo by Rob Alvo)

If you want to see many species of birds, you will undoubtedly be faced with a choice: visit only one or two sites to maximize the chances of seeing what is present, or visiting many sites to maximize the number of species that don’t require...

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Something's Fishy: Hook, line and thinker

Child enjoying the weather and fishing (Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Headquarters, CC BY 2.0)

One of my favourite things about fish is how deeply rooted they are in Canadian culture. From traditional depictions in Indigenous artwork to the crispy, flaky haddock served with a side of PEI potatoes at fish and chips joints across the country,...

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Bringing communities together: The Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup

Hauling foam, a buoy and other marine debris during a 2016 Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup. (Photo courtesy of Rachel Schoeler)

As an avid open water swimmer, I learned to respect our waterways while fighting through the smack and splash of ocean waves during long training swims. I fell in love with our waterways during calm, quiet morning swims out on the lake. And I...

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Look for these first signs of spring across Canada

Red-winged blackbird (Photo by Bill Hubick)

Red-winged blackbird (Photo by Bill Hubick)

With the springing forward of our clocks and increased daylight, many Canadians are getting antsy for the arrival of spring, perhaps especially for our friends in the Atlantic provinces (darn you, Nor’easter!). What can be more delightful...

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A walk with Robert Frost: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The woods by my parents' house (Photo by Kailey Setter/NCC staff)

While science and logic have the ability to influence our thoughts, poetry has a marvellous ability to move our hearts and capture our imagination. Robert Frost has long been my favourite poet. Not just because his poems are relatively short and...

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