2020 may just have been Canada’s most important year for nature conservation

Hiking on Darkwoods, BC (Photo by Gordon MacPherson)

Hiking on Darkwoods, BC (Photo by Gordon MacPherson)

A year ago, there was much anticipation in the conservation community that 2020 would perhaps be the most important year ever for nature. Canada’s Nature Fund promised to accelerate the conservation of our wild spaces and species. There was...

Continue Reading »

The plants we leave behind

1925 Canadian National Railways Algonquin Park pamphlet showing painting of Highland Inn on cover, with centerfold photographs of Highland Inn, Nominigan Camp and Camp Minnesing (Public Domain)

1925 Canadian National Railways Algonquin Park pamphlet showing painting of Highland Inn on cover, with centerfold photographs of Highland Inn, Nominigan Camp and Camp Minnesing (Public Domain)

Nominigan Camp in Ontario’s Algonquin Park was built along the shore of Smoke Lake in 1913. During its peak, the log cabins and main lodge could host almost 100 guests. It later became a private residence and was abandoned and dismantled...

Continue Reading »

Stopping habitat loss is the key to saving Canada’s endangered species

Evening grosbeak (Photo by Anna Tchoulik)

Evening grosbeak (Photo by Anna Tchoulik)

Canada has been losing and saving species for a long time. Since European settlement, over 100 species have been lost here. These include plants and animals that are extinct and extirpated and species that are considered historic (no one has seen...

Continue Reading »

Lake Erie: Recovery, or requiem?

Aerial view of Point Pelee, ON (Photo by Gerry Kaiser)

Aerial view of Point Pelee, ON (Photo by Gerry Kaiser)

Someone recently asked me how I would invest a million dollars to help conserve Lake Erie. My first thoughts were that I would use that money to protect wetlands and other habitats on the coast, or maybe to help farmers create wider buffer strips...

Continue Reading »

Seeing Canada through the trees: How Canadians can lead the world in forest conservation

Whitemouth River Watershed Natural Area, MB (Photo by Mike Dembeck)

Whitemouth River Watershed Natural Area, MB (Photo by Mike Dembeck)

Forests define our Canadian geography and identity. One-third of our country is covered with trees, and forests occur in every province and territory. Jobs in forestry employ more than 200,000 Canadians and support many Indigenous and northern...

Continue Reading »

Celebrating and conserving all-Canadian wildlife

Eastern wolf (Photo by Rebecca Rogge, iNaturalist)

Eastern wolf (Photo by Rebecca Rogge, iNaturalist)

Every nation plays an important role in stopping wildlife extinction. Here in Canada, we have an estimated 80,000 known wild species. They range from pygmy shrew to polar bear, and from stellate sedge to Sitka spruce. Canada plays a critical role...

Continue Reading »

Where the river stops: Why habitat connectivity is critical for healthy fish populations across Canada

Spawning Chinook salmon (Photo by Fish On in the Yukon)

Spawning Chinook salmon (Photo by Fish On in the Yukon)

Before you read any further, stop and think about a fish migrating up a river. Chances are that fish is a salmon and that river is in BC. There’s good reason that salmon in BC have come to symbolize fish migration. The return of millions of...

Continue Reading »

Navigating a course for Canada's Marine Protected Areas on World Oceans Day

Rocks and ocean as seen on the Dr. Bill Freedman Nature Reserve (Photo by NCC)

Rocks and ocean as seen on the Dr. Bill Freedman Nature Reserve (Photo by NCC)

Oceans and coasts are a key part of Canada’s environment, economy and identity, and yet most of us are unaware of how they are protected, and why conserving them is critical. Precious resources rich in life Oceans touch every Canadian...

Continue Reading »

Tales of recovery: Greater short-horned lizard

Greater short-horned lizard. (Photo by Leta Pezderic/NCC staff)

Greater short-horned lizard. (Photo by Leta Pezderic/NCC staff)

I’ve been lucky to have seen many reptiles that are at risk in Canada. I started my ecological career at Point Pelee National Park counting Blanding’s turtles and map turtles. I’ve seen queen snakes poke their heads through the...

Continue Reading »

Thinking about water

Bow Lake, AB (Photo by Sarah Boon)

Bow Lake, AB (Photo by Sarah Boon)

Here in Canada, it’s a luxury to not think about water. Most of us watch it come out of the tap and go down the drain without considering its source or destination. But many people in the world don’t have taps or drains. In fact over...

Continue Reading »

Items 1 - 10 of 71  12345678Next