The future of conservation is female (part one)

Jenna Siu (Photo by NCC)

Jenna Siu (Photo by NCC)

In honour of International Women’s Day (March 8), over the course of the month we will be celebrating three young women who work for the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC’s) Ontario Region. We will speak with them to learn more...

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The challenge of beaver dams in Blanding's turtle habitat

Blanding's Turtle (Photo by NCC)

Blanding's Turtle (Photo by NCC)

The beaver and the turtle: it sounds like a Jean de LaFontaine fable, but for my colleague Milaine Saumur, the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC’s) project manager in the Outaouais, Quebec, it's a true story. A couple of months ago...

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Antlers of the East: Tracking the decline of the Atlantic-Gaspésie caribou (part two)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

In part one of Antlers of the East, I discussed the decline of the Atlantic-Gaspésie caribou. Here is part two. Stand against extinction Since 2008, the caribou of Gaspésie National Park have been under the thoughtful study of...

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Adjusting to change

Assiniboine Delta, MB (Photo by Jordan Becker)

Assiniboine Delta, MB (Photo by Jordan Becker)

“According to Darwin’s Origin of Species, it is not the most intellectual of the species that survives; it is not the strongest that survives; but the species that survives is the one that is able best to adapt and adjust to the...

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Something’s Fishy: Polar opposites

Polar bear mother and cub, Jones Sound, Nunavut (Photo by NCC)

Polar bear mother and cub, Jones Sound, Nunavut (Photo by NCC)

Polar bears are the largest bear species and land carnivore in the world. They are found in the Arctic, where they scour sea ice and coasts for their next meal. Two-thirds of the global population of polar bears is found in Canada. The...

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Reach new heights: Take your adventure to another level by exploring the iconic hoodoos

Dutch Creek Hoodoos, BC (Photo by NCC)

Dutch Creek Hoodoos, BC (Photo by NCC)

Craggy spires rise up and tower over the north end of Columbia Lake. A result of thousands of years of glaciation, followed by erosion from meltwater and weather, the Dutch Creek Hoodoos are a testament to the grand geologic forces of the...

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In the depths of the Lac-à-la-Tortue bog

Lac-à-la tortue (Photo by NCC)

Lac-à-la tortue (Photo by NCC)

Peatlands are wetlands composed of plant residues accumulated over thousands of years. Although they are widespread in Quebec, many people don't know about them. However they provide us with many essential services, such as water filtration and...

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Acknowledging change

Growing up on a farm in southwestern Manitoba, some of my clearest memories are of the extreme temperatures I experienced. (Photo courtesy of Steven Anderson)

Growing up on a farm in southwestern Manitoba, some of my clearest memories are of the extreme temperatures I experienced. (Photo courtesy of Steven Anderson)

“Everything changes and nothing stands still.” ~ Heraclitus of Ephesus, as quoted by Plato Growing up on a farm in southwestern Manitoba, some of my clearest memories are of the extreme temperatures I experienced in that lovely...

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My bucket list adventure in the Galapagos Islands

Kristyn Ferguson in the Galapagos Islands (Photo by Jeff Verberne)

Kristyn Ferguson in the Galapagos Islands (Photo by Jeff Verberne)

For many biologists, the Galapagos Islands are usually near the top of their list of places to see in this lifetime. On my bucket list they were annotated with an “!”. When my mentor and good friend James Duncan passed away suddenly in...

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What ash trees and bumble bees are telling us

American bumble bee (Photo by K.S. Gardener/iNaturalist)

American bumble bee (Photo by K.S. Gardener/iNaturalist)

Black ash and American bumble bee are not species I thought we would ever need to save. When I started my studies in conservation over 25 years ago, bumble bees still seemed commonplace, and I thought of ash as a common tree that was great for...

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