Three reasons why it’s important to study winter

Me, my husband and dog bundled up during the polar vortex (Photo courtesy of Meghan Duell)

Me, my husband and dog bundled up during the polar vortex (Photo courtesy of Meghan Duell)

We tend to think of winter in temperate regions as cold, maybe snowy, maybe grey and with short daylight hours. Maybe you hate winter because you dislike feeling cold, having chapped skin, driving on icy roads and...insert weather problem here...

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The future of conservation is female (part two)

Esme Batten (Photo by Esme Batten)

Esme Batten (Photo by Esme Batten)

In honour of International Women’s Day (March 8), over the course of the month, we are celebrating three young women working for the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC’s) Ontario Region. We speak with them to learn more about...

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Frick, I love nature: Comedy as nature education

"Frick, I love nature" logo (Photo by Stephen Robinson)

Last fall I was on a trip with my girlfriend on Vancouver Island. While there, we spent a good chunk of our time exploring its national parks and learning about how life survives in those particular ecosystems. While soaking it all in, I had a...

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Heard it from a Scout: Arctic action — a call for conservation

An aerial view of the Arctic landscape (Photo by NCC)

An aerial view of the Arctic landscape (Photo by NCC)

Each unique landscape in this world — whether it’s a forest, prairie, desert or the Arctic — plays a pivotal role in nature. The Arctic, in particular, supports a variety of flora and fauna while also helping to regulate global...

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The future of conservation is female (Part one)

Jenna Siu (Photo by NCC)

Jenna Siu (Photo by NCC)

In honour of International Women’s Day (March 8), over the course of the month we will be celebrating three young women who work for the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC’s) Ontario Region. We will speak with them to learn more...

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Antlers of the East: Tracking the decline of the Atlantic-Gaspésie caribou (part two)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

Woodland caribou at the summit of Mont Jacques-Cartier, tallest among the Chic Choc Mountains of Gaspésie National Park, QC. (Photo by Zack Metcalfe)

In part one of Antlers of the East, I discussed the decline of the Atlantic-Gaspésie caribou. Here is part two. Stand against extinction Since 2008, the caribou of Gaspésie National Park have been under the thoughtful study of...

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Adjusting to change

Assiniboine Delta, MB (Photo by Jordan Becker)

Assiniboine Delta, MB (Photo by Jordan Becker)

“According to Darwin’s Origin of Species, it is not the most intellectual of the species that survives; it is not the strongest that survives; but the species that survives is the one that is able best to adapt and adjust to the...

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Something’s Fishy: Polar opposites

Polar bear mother and cub, Jones Sound, Nunavut (Photo by NCC)

Polar bear mother and cub, Jones Sound, Nunavut (Photo by NCC)

Polar bears are the largest bear species and land carnivore in the world. They are found in the Arctic, where they scour sea ice and coasts for their next meal. Two-thirds of the global population of polar bears is found in Canada. The...

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Unlikely animal pairings: Part two

Brown-headed cowbird (Photo by David Dodd CC BY-NC)

Brown-headed cowbird (Photo by David Dodd CC BY-NC)

This is part two of a two-part series on unlikely animal pairings. Check out part one, the hunting partnership between an American badger and a coyote, here. Another unlikely animal partnership features a bird that is known to take advantage of...

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Reach new heights: Take your adventure to another level by exploring the iconic hoodoos

Dutch Creek Hoodoos, BC (Photo by NCC)

Dutch Creek Hoodoos, BC (Photo by NCC)

Craggy spires rise up and tower over the north end of Columbia Lake. A result of thousands of years of glaciation, followed by erosion from meltwater and weather, the Dutch Creek Hoodoos are a testament to the grand geologic forces of the...

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