Thirteen spooky facts about Canadian bats

Big brown bat <i>(Eptesicus fuscus)</i> (Photo by Brock Fenton)

Big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) (Photo by Brock Fenton)

There are 19 known bat species in Canada. Although they are subjected to a spooky stigma around Halloween, they’re nothing to be afraid of. Here are 13 things you didn’t know about this not-so-scary mammal: 1. The snooze button....

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Bats of the Happy Valley Forest region

Little brown myotis (Photo by Brock Fenton)

Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) (Photo by Brock Fenton)

I’ve had many encounters with bats in the Happy Valley Forest over the years, but perhaps the most memorable was the one day in my practicing years when I was asked to visit on elderly lady at home. Consultants tend to eschew house-calls.As...

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Birds of the Happy Valley Forest (Part Five)

Evening grosbeak, once a most common invader from the boreal forest each winter. In recent years less frequently appearing. (Photo by Anna Tchoulik)

Evening grosbeak, once a most common invader from the boreal forest each winter. In recent years less frequently appearing. (Photo by Anna Tchoulik)

Our forest cover in the Happy Valley begins a few miles above the lakeshore of Lake Ontario. Birds stop here each year to feed and rest while on their migration north in the spring, and as a last stop in the fall as they move south. In the fall...

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La science des couleurs d’automne

Forêts-parcs à trembles à l’automne, Saskatchewan (photo de Don et Karol Dabbs)

Forêts-parcs à trembles à l’automne, Saskatchewan (photo de Don et Karol Dabbs)

Les forêts du Canada abritent de nombreux personnages colorés. Elles recèlent de fleurs sauvages aux couleurs vives, d’oiseaux chanteurs parés d’éclatants plumages, d’insectes étincelants...

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Birds of the Happy Valley Forest (Part Four)

This hawk lives in closed canopies such as those found in Happy Valley and thrives on small mammals and birds. (Photo by Dr. Henry Barnett)

This hawk lives in closed canopies such as those found in Happy Valley and thrives on small mammals and birds. (Photo by Dr. Henry Barnett)

During our five-year participation in Ontario in the Breeding Bird Census, daughter Ann Love and I found 109 breeding species in the Happy Valley Forest area or species seen regularly overhead in breeding season. The Happy Valley Forest has no...

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Clarenceville Bog BioBlitz

Clarenceville bog BioBlitz (Photo by NCC)

Clarenceville bog BioBlitz (Photo by NCC)

When people asked what I was doing over the weekend, and I replied “Going to a bog,” the reactions ranged from puzzled faces to outright laughter. In the acoustic sense, the word “bog” isn’t particularly charming. And...

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Why forests matter to me: Quotes from staff and supporters

Ogilvie sunset on forest, BC (Photo by NCC)

Ogilvie sunset on forest, BC (Photo by NCC)

Across the country, countless Canadians have been celebrating trees and forests last week as well as welcoming the arrival of fall. Although National Forest Week is behind us, there are good reasons to continue appreciating our forests and trees!...

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Why Canada needs more forest conservation

Forest in Saint-Georges-de-Clarenceville (Photo by NCC)

Forest in Saint-Georges-de-Clarenceville (Photo by NCC)

Canada is a nation defined by many things: multiculturalism, hockey, universal health care, politeness, eh? We’re also a nation defined by our landscapes. Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King once referred to Canada as a country with...

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Birds of the Happy Valley Forest (Part Three)

Pileated woodpecker, the size of a small crow, is the glamour boy of the Happy Valley Forest. His shouting call is heard throughout the year. (Photo by Dr. Henry Barnett)

Pileated woodpecker, the size of a small crow, is the glamour boy of the Happy Valley Forest. His shouting call is heard throughout the year. (Photo by Dr. Henry Barnett)

Without a doubt the pileated woodpecker is close to the top of dramatic inhabitants of the Happy Valley Forest. Its demanding call is befitting of the crow-like size and overall rugged appearance — wild! One cannot walk in the forest in the...

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Grandparents in the natural world

Old-growth forest (Photo by NCC)

Old-growth forest (Photo by NCC)

I often find similarity in the structure of human society and the ecosystems in nature. Reflecting on how our community is comprised of people from all walks and stages of life, I can’t help but think the same about forests. As Grandparents...

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