An osprey family affair

Osprey soars around its nest (Photo by Lorne)

Osprey soars around its nest (Photo by Lorne)

This journey of an osprey family, between early May 2015 and mid-August of the same year, is almost as much my journey as theirs. It begins as a young boy some six decades ago, when my maternal grandfather would pick me up to spend some quality...

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Ferns and mosses of the Happy Valley Forest

The Christmas fern, green against dead leaves in the fall (Photo by Dr. Henry Barnett)

The Christmas fern, green against dead leaves in the fall (Photo by Dr. Henry Barnett)

The Happy Valley Forest is home to a large number of common and uncommon ferns (my daughter Ann Love has records of 18 fern species in this forest area). The Christmas fern is very common in the forest and at its edges. It retains its green...

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Reptiles and amphibians of the Happy Valley Forest

Red eft (the immature form of the spotted newt) are the commonest reptile in the Happy Valley Forest and crowd the forest trails during egg-laying time. (Photo by Dr. Henry Barnett)

Red eft (the immature form of the spotted newt) are the commonest reptile in the Happy Valley Forest and crowd the forest trails during egg-laying time. (Photo by Dr. Henry Barnett)

The reptile species in the Happy Valley Forest number 19. The area provides one of the last redoubts for the threatened Jefferson’s salamander. Red efts are common, red-backed and spotted salamanders will be regularly seen in the but the...

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Sign, sign, everywhere a sign!

Group photo at Fishing Lake, ON (Photo by Nick Tardif)

Group photo at Fishing Lake, ON (Photo by Nick Tardif)

It was the Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign Conservation Volunteers event at The Nature Conservancy of Canada’s (NCC’s) Fishing Lake property in the Frontenac Arch Natural Area. We were there, on time, and rearing to go. There were six...

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A natural take on Black Friday

Crow (Photo by Linda Tanner, Wikimedia Commons)

Crow (Photo by Linda Tanner, Wikimedia Commons)

Learn more about a few of our Canadian species and share these tweets to show others how natural #BlackFriday can be! ...

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Mammals of the Happy Valley Forest

White-tailed deer thrive in Happy Valley Forest wintering in the Hemlock areas of relatively less snow. (Photo by Dean Mullin)

White-tailed deer thrive in Happy Valley Forest wintering in the Hemlock areas of relatively less snow. (Photo by Dean Mullin)

In the wintertime the mammals are the most conspicuous form of life in the forest. The largest is the white-tailed deer, of which as many as nine have appeared below our feeder. Squirrels are the commonest mammal, with the black and its colour...

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Thirteen spooky facts about Canadian bats

Big brown bat <i>(Eptesicus fuscus)</i> (Photo by Brock Fenton)

Big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) (Photo by Brock Fenton)

There are 19 known bat species in Canada. Although they are subjected to a spooky stigma around Halloween, they’re nothing to be afraid of. Here are 13 things you didn’t know about this not-so-scary mammal: 1. The snooze button....

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Bats of the Happy Valley Forest region

Little brown myotis (Photo by Brock Fenton)

Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) (Photo by Brock Fenton)

I’ve had many encounters with bats in the Happy Valley Forest over the years, but perhaps the most memorable was the one day in my practicing years when I was asked to visit on elderly lady at home. Consultants tend to eschew house-calls.As...

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Birds of the Happy Valley Forest (Part Five)

Evening grosbeak, once a most common invader from the boreal forest each winter. In recent years less frequently appearing. (Photo by Anna Tchoulik)

Evening grosbeak, once a most common invader from the boreal forest each winter. In recent years less frequently appearing. (Photo by Anna Tchoulik)

Our forest cover in the Happy Valley begins a few miles above the lakeshore of Lake Ontario. Birds stop here each year to feed and rest while on their migration north in the spring, and as a last stop in the fall as they move south. In the fall...

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La science des couleurs d’automne

Forêts-parcs à trembles à l’automne, Saskatchewan (photo de Don et Karol Dabbs)

Forêts-parcs à trembles à l’automne, Saskatchewan (photo de Don et Karol Dabbs)

Les forêts du Canada abritent de nombreux personnages colorés. Elles recèlent de fleurs sauvages aux couleurs vives, d’oiseaux chanteurs parés d’éclatants plumages, d’insectes étincelants...

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